CONJUNCTIVE ADVERBS (Contrast, Condition, Comparison, Result)

a. Conjunctive adverbs of Contrast : When a sentence shows an unexpected result of another sentence.

=> However : showing general contrasts, used when you are saying something that is different from or contrasts with a previous statement. Example : Raqheel had the flu and should have stayed home; however, she went to work.

=> Nevertheless : showing unexpected results, in spite of what has just been said. Example : Vian didn’t study and had poor notes from the class lectures; nevertheless, he got a high mark on the test.

=> Still : showing unexpected results. Example : Bob had a flat tire and traffic was very heavy; still, he made it to work on time.

 

b. Conjunctive adverbs of Condition : The conjunctive adverb means “if not”, it’s used when the second sentence shows the result if the first sentence doesn’t happen.

=> Otherwise : means in a different way or manner. Example : Be ready in five minutes; otherwise I’ll leave without you.

 

c. Conjuctive adverbs of Comparison : To compare things.

=> Likewise : means “in the same way”. Example : I love my child; likewise, I love myself.

 

d. Conjunctive adverbs of Result : To explain result at that time at the same time besides.

=> Therefore : means for that reason or cause. Example : She studied hard; therefore, she got 1st rank in her class.

=> Consequently : means something that results from an event. Example : Mikha is a wonderful teacher; consequently, many parents want their children in her classroom.

=> Accordingly : means correspondingly Example : It rained very hard; accordingly, the soccer game was canceled.

=> Hence : means “so”. Example : He always go to school early; hence, he never late.

=> Thus : means “so”. Example : Icha is a diligent student; thus, she has a lot of friends.

 

 

Bibliography :

http://www.eslcafe.com/grammar.html

http://www.abaenglish.com/blog/english-grammar-learn-english-with-aba/english-grammar-linking-adverbs-and-transition-words/

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